The village of Sutton Veny is situated about three miles south-east from the centre of Warminster and about a mile south-west from Heytesbury. In 1881 the area of the parish was 3,580 a. of land and inland water, but within the next decade changes in the parish boundary enlarged the area to 4, 111 a. In 1884 land in Southleigh Wood, formerly a detached part of Heytesbury parish, and Pit Mead, a stretch of meadowland south of the Wylye, previously divided between Warminster, Bishopstrow, and Norton Bavant, were brought within the parish boundary. Two years later the whole of the northern part of the ancient parish of Pertwood was transferred to Sutton Veny. The acreage of the parish (4, 111 a.) then remained unchanged until 1934 when 151 a., representing a narrow tongue of land stretching westwards and taking in part of the hamlet of Crockerton, were detached from Sutton Veny and added to Longbridge Deverill..........
.....................The oldest part of the village seems to be its south-east end, which was once the separate tithing of Great Sutton. The parish church, the rectory, and, after 1850, the village school, all lay here until towards the end of the 19th century. (fn. 22) Here, too, on either side of the lane leading to the church, were Church and Polebridge farms, which were possibly the demesne farms of the two manors of Great, or Fenny, Sutton, dismembered in the 17th century. After both farms were acquired at the beginning of the 20th century by the Hon. W. P. Alexander, the dwelling-house of Church farm became his residence, and has since been called Polebridge House..................
................In 1963 the main part of the village lay along the secondary road from Warminster which forms the village street for about of a mile and runs through the former tithing of Newnham. The new parish church, the school, and the Congregational chapel were all built on the north-east side of this street in the later 19th century. Many of the houses along the street date from the early 19th century and are of coursed rubble with red-brick dressings. A few houses are, however, earlier, being of stone ashlar with mullioned windows, and on the southwest side of the street there is a row of four cottages, originally one building, which has exposed timberframing. The brick gutters running along either side of the road were constructed to replace earlier unpaved ditches in 1868 when the vestry was particularly concerned with the insanitary state of the parish. A number of the cottages flank the road so closely that at that date dirt and damp from these ditches sometimes seeped through their walls.

From: 'Sutton Veny', A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 8: Warminster, Westbury and Whorwellsdown Hundreds (1965), pp. 61-74. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16078 Date accessed: 02 July 2009.